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#ContentWritingChat, best-selling author

#ContentWritingChat Recap: Becoming a Best-Selling Author in a Digital Age with Kristin Smedley

Are you an author or thinking about writing your very first book?

If so, there’s a good chance that you aspire to become a best-selling author! You want to get your book in the hands of tons of people around the world. That’s the dream when you’re a writer, isn’t it?

Well, we wanted to get some tips on how to do just that, so we invited a best-selling author to guest host our Twitter chat, #ContentWritingChat, and share her expertise!

#ContentWritingChat Recap: Becoming a Best-Selling Author in a Digital Age with Kristin Smedley

Our guest host for this month’s chat was Kristin Smedley. Kristin is a CEO, a TEDx speaker, and a best-selling author. The Kindle edition of her book, Thriving Blind, debuted as a #1 New Release and a #2 Best Seller on Amazon. And the paperback version debuted as a #1 New Release as well!

Q1: Q1: Why should people consider becoming an author in 2020? And how do you know if writing a book is a great path for you to take?

If you’ve been on the fence about writing a book this year, let us convince you! Our chat participants shared the benefits of becoming an author and it’s sure to leave you feeling motivated to write!

Kristin feels a book is a great way position yourself as a leader in your industry. It’s also a fantastic way to serve your audience and provide value to them. She also went on to share that books can provide content for your social media platforms, your blog, and more since they can be repurposed into quotes, chapter summaries, and other options.

And of course, writing a book can definitely add some cash to your bank account, which is always a plus. Kristin mentioned that it might not be a huge revenue stream, but every little bit counts!

The resident author here at Express Writers, our CEO Julia McCoy, said that writing a book is the best kind of content you can create if you want to create a long-lasting presence. You can see her with all three of her book babies in the photos above!

A book can lead to many amazing opportunities, as Michelle mentioned in her tweet. If you’re looking to get into public speaking, starting with writing a book could be a huge help to get your career as a speaker off the ground.

Carla feels that everyone has a story to tell. So, the question is, are you ready to tell yours? She suggests examining the market and seeing if there’s anything new you could add through creating a book of your own.

Q2: Once you’ve decided to write a book, should you consider self-publishing? What are the pros of doing it on your own?

When publishing a book, you can really go one of two ways. And when it comes to self-publishing, it’s certainly increased in popularity over the years. It’s made it even easier for people around the world to become authors. But before you go all in, there are some things you should keep in mind:

Kristin self-published her first book, Thriving Blind. Doing so allowed her to see first-hand the difficulties in getting braille books for blind readers. She even plans to self-publish her next two books because she feels the process is fairly easy and she’s confident in her marketing skills. Being able to market your own book is crucial if you want to become a best-selling author through self-publishing.

Self-publishing is certainly for those who want all the freedom!

Maria feels self-publishing is beneficial because it gives the author more control and freedom when it comes to making decisions about the book. If you’re feeling good about taking everything into your own hands, self-publishing could be a great option for you.

Julia agrees that you’ll have full control over everything when it comes to your book if you go the self-publishing route. That means any changes, artwork, etc. all fall on you. Plus, getting to keep a larger percentage of your royalties is definitely a bonus.

Q3: Do you have any tips for the writing process to ensure you’re staying motivated and inspired?

Let’s be real. The writing process isn’t always sunshine and rainbows. Sometimes it’s downright challenging! So, if you need some help staying on track with your writing goals, keep this advice in mind:

Kristin suggests holding yourself accountable by telling other people that you’re writing a book. Share it with your online community, as well as friends and family. It gets them interested in what you’re working on and they just might check in on your progress from time to time!

She also put a “Best-Selling Author” logo on her vision board, which she sees every day. This served as a reminder of what she’s working toward and surely adds some extra motivation when you’re not feeling called to sit down and write.

Some other suggestions from Kristin to keep those creative juices flowing… Do you when it comes to your writing schedule, such as how much and how frequently you write. Also, become an active member of online groups that will benefit from your book. Observe their conversations and get to know them.

Julia finds it beneficial to have scheduled writing times that coordinate with when you’re most productive. If you’re an early bird that gets things done first thing, make this your writing time.

She also suggests avoiding writing when you’re burnt out (taking time for rest is important), stay hydrated and nourished, and make sure you sign offline to give yourself a break from the internet on occasion.

Remember who you’re doing this for. Think about your book being in the hands of your ideal readers and how game-changing this book will be in their lives. That’s sure to inspire you!

Also, don’t forget to keep a journal nearby because you never know when inspiration will strike!

Q4: What tools are going to be beneficial in the writing and publication process?

As you dive into writing and publishing, there are some things you’ll want to have in your toolbox to help the process go smoothly. Here are some recommendations:

Kristin relies on the Notes app, as well as Post-it Notes and a whiteboard. She also shared a very important reminder that it’s smart to have an external hard drive to keep everything backed up and safe.

Evernote is also another handy tool for brainstorming, storing ideas, and even writing if you want!

Julia’s go-to tools include notepads and journals, her Apple computer, Scrivener app, Google Docs, and an amazing team for additional support.

You really can’t go wrong with Google Docs! It’s all about using what works for you.

Q5: How can you be sure your book is actually going to appeal to your audience and provide value?

As you’re writing your book and well on your way to becoming a best-selling author, you may be wondering if this book is actually going to be interesting to your audience. Well, if you find yourself asking this question, here’s what you need to know:

Q6: Once your book is finished, how can you spread the word and gain more readers?

Now that it’s time to drive sales so you can become that best-selling author you’ve been dreaming about, there are some tips you need to know about spreading the word!

Kristin’s first tip is to start spreading the word early… Before you’ve even finished the book!

She also suggests building an email list so you have somewhere to promote the book and update them on your writing progress. Kristin also had some other great ideas like reaching out to bloggers in your niche and pitching yourself for podcast interviews.

Michelle knows the promotion stage is where some PR really comes in handy. She says to put together a press kit, a media list, and start pitching. Another option is to participate in book giveaways, plan a launch party (it can even be virtual), and have readings/signings at local bookstores.

Julia knows it’s all about the email list. She wrote a five-day launch campaign via email when her book launched where she shared her story and asked for reviews.

Besides email, make sure you’re spreading the word via social media. In order to become a best-selling author, you need to tell the world about your book!

Q7: For Kristin Smedley: What are some unique things you did in self-publishing your book, Thriving Blind?

Kristin really got creative when it came to self-publishing her book. Here are some of the things she did:

Kristin took some extra steps to get books published in electronic Braille. She won a Twitter contest where money was donated to create the Braille version of her book. And she even enlisted the help of her 6th grade English teacher to edit the book, while getting a former classmate to do the cover.

Want to join in for the next #ContentWritingChat? It happens on Twitter on the first Tuesday of every month at 10 AM Central. Just follow @ExpWriters and @writingchat to stay updated!

promote your books on social media

#ContentWritingChat Recap: Authors: How to Successfully Promote Your Books on Social Media with Lori Anding

Calling all authors and aspiring authors!

It’s no secret that the success of your book largely depends on how you promote it and spread the word to your audience. After all, you need to get your book into the hands of as many people as you can, right?

If you’re wondering how to effectively promote your current or next book on social media, we’ve got you covered with this week’s #ContentWritingChat.

There are tons of promotional tips that you can use, no matter what genre your book is! And there are some great tactics in this recap.

#ContentWritingChat Recap: Authors: How to Successfully Promote Your Books on Social Media with Lori Anding

Our guest host this week was Lori Anding. Lori is a frequent participant of #ContentWritingChat. She knows a great deal about how to successfully promote your books on social media so you can increase sales. Keep reading to find out her tips and advice from other chat participants!

Q1: Do you have an e-book or self-published book? What strategies have you used to get them in the hands of readers?

To kick off the chat, we asked everyone to share whether or not they’ve published a book before. And if so, we wanted to know what they did to spread the word. Here are a few responses:

Kathryn knows that building relationships is key to getting your books out there to your audience. People are more likely to support someone they know, like, and trust.

Although Lexie doesn’t have a book, she shared a great tip about contacting book bloggers. You can give an advance copy to some of the top book bloggers and have them review it. It’s a fantastic way to gain more exposure.

Although Annette said she’d do things differently now, she used to give her books away and sell them at poetry readings. That can be very effective if you attend events where your ideal reader is hanging out.

Q2: You’re in the process of writing a book. When should you start thinking about book launching strategies?

At one point in time do you start considering how you’ll promote your books on social media? Do you wait until it’s done or get started earlier? Here are some thoughts from Tuesday’s chat:

Lori said you should begin thinking about launching strategies before you start writing. This will allow you to build your audience and engage with them long before the book is available. That way, they’ll be primed and ready to buy when it launches. She pointed out that social media is a fantastic way to do this, so begin building your audience there now.

Julia said to think about how you will promote your book at least one year before you publish. Even better, she advises you to think about it before you start writing. As she said, you want to have a warm audience ready and waiting to buy your book.

Lexie said to begin thinking about your launch once you have your book topic and idea.

Maria agrees that it’s important to think about promotional strategies early on. It can help raise awareness and build engagement around the book.

Q3: What does it mean to think with the end in mind in terms of launching a book to your audience?

So, what does it mean? Check out these responses from the chat:

For Lori, thinking with the end in mind means knowing how you want to promote your books on social media. You may be relying on organic reach if you don’t have the budget to pay for promotion, which is totally fine. You have to determine what’s going to work for you.

She did share some great advice about organic promotion though. If you begin building your audience early enough, they can actually help you spread the word about your book. That can deliver tremendous reach!

Julia said it’s important to become an expert in your field and earn your authority before you start writing. People will be more likely to purchase your book if you’ve already established yourself.

Q4: Your book is finally complete! Does this mean all of the marketing is taken care of? If not, what’s left for you to do?

What happens after the book is all done? Do you get to kick back on the beach and relax? Or is there still work to be done? Here’s what you need to know to promote your books on social media once it’s complete:

Lori knows that the marketing doesn’t end once your book is on the shelves (or listed on Amazon). You still have to take action to get your book out there to the world. She suggests holding giveaways, which can generate a lot of excitement. You can also be a guest on relevant podcasts because you want to take advantage of any opportunity to talk about your book.

She also said to encourage people to pre-order your book. This is a fantastic way to boost sales and it could help get you a little closer to being on that Bestseller list.

Another tip Lori had was to record an audio version of your book as well. Many people listen to audiobooks while on their commute or when getting ready in the morning. You don’t want to lose potential buyers because you lack an audio version.

Julia’s advice s to create a specific sign-up page before launching the book. This is a great way to gauge interest. Plus, when the book is live, you can directly contact those people and let them know it’s time to buy.

She also suggests promoting a tweet or Facebook post with a video, emailing your current list, and linking to your book in all of your online bios.

Gene knows getting the word out on social is very important to your book’s success. He also suggests doing a book tour. If there’s enough interest and you have the funds, this is a fantastic way to boost sales.

As Terry said, we live in a digital age where there are so many ways to get creative with how you promote your book on social media. Some ideas he shared include: doing a YouTube series, running a contests on Twitter and Instagram, going on podcasts, running ads on social media, and doing book signings.

This is a great reminder from Zala. The networking never stops when you’re an author! There’s always going to be an opportunity to promote your book.

Q5: How can you use social media to generate more awareness of your book?

We all know that social media can really come in handy when it comes to spreading the word about your book. But how can you truly take advantage of what it has to offer? Check out these tips:

To promote your book on social media, Lori suggests holding giveaways/contests, being a guest on podcasts, and sharing the process on Instagram Stories. Giving potential readers a behind-the-scenes really helps develop a relationship with them. They’ll feel connected to you and more compelled to buy the book since they’ve followed your journey in creating it.

Don’t forget to be social on social media. It’s important to build relationships with people so they actually want to support you. Another tip that Kathryn shared is to create quote images with snippets from your book. It’s simple, but effective.

Lexie suggests using paid ads on social media to expand your reach. Just make sure you’re choosing the platforms your ideal reader is actively using. She also said you can target audiences who like a book that’s similar to yours, which is very smart.

Zala’s advice is to: build an audience, build a community, join Twitter chats, cross-promote on chats/blogs/podcasts/videos, and ask your network to help spread the word.

You can even share teasers, answer questions related to your book, create videos, and so much more.

Doing an Instagram Story where you visit book stores and find your book on the shelves in a fantastic idea that Terry shared with us. He also suggested doing a selfie contest on Instagram or Twitter where readers take a picture with the book and share it online. Give a signed copy or something else to a couple of people who participated.

You can post snippets from the book, ask readers to share reviews, and hold AMAs to generate interest. AMAs are a great way for the audience to get to know the author better.

Don’t forget to make use of trending and relevant hashtags to promote your book on social media!

Q6: What are some specific Twitter strategies you can implement to increase your book sales?

What can you do specifically on Twitter to see major results when you promote your book? Here’s some great advice from our chat:

Lori suggests creating graphics and videos to get people insight and host a Twitter chat about your book.

Zala said to include your link in your Twitter bio and take advantage of a pinned tweet for promtion. These tips are simple, but often forgotten!

Julia also suggests using a pinned tweet. She said dong a video works really well.

You can also add an image of your book in your Twitter header, plus a quote from the book or one from a reviewer.

Make sure you’re engaging with your audience and getting them excited about your book.

Q7: Once people have purchased your book, how do you get them to leave a review?

Reviews are crucial for authors because it can help them sell more books in the long run. But when everyone is so busy, how do you get readers to stop and write a review? Check out this advice:

Make sure you’re building a relationship with your community online. Lori feels this will increase your chances of getting a review. Plus, you can also send advance copies for people to review ahead of time.

Don’t be afraid to just ask people for a review. Sometimes they need the reminder and a little push!

Terry suggests sending out email reminders to encourage people to leave reviews. You can offer some sort of incentive as well.

Another great tip is to include a thank you page at the end of the book, which gives you the chance to ask people to leave a review now that they’re done reading.

Would you like to join us for the next #ContentWritingChat? We’ll be chatting next Tuesday from 10-11 AM Central! Make sure you follow @ExpWriters and @writingchat so you don’t miss anything.

turn your content into a book

#ContentWritingChat Recap: How to Turn Your Content Into a Book with Leah Ingram

Have you ever thought about turning your content into a book? If so, you might be wondering how to get started with this process! In this week’s #ContentWritingChat, this is exactly what we talked about.

We talked about what you need to do first if you want to write a book, the pros and cons of working with a publisher versus self-publishing, and more! If this chat is right up your alley, keep reading for out recap. It’s loaded with all the tips you need.

#ContentWritingChat Recap: How to Turn Your Content Into a Book With Leah Ingram

Our guest host this week was Leah Ingram. Leah is a regular #ContentWritingChat participant, so we were thrilled to have her guest hosting. As a writer, she had a lot of amazing tips to help you create a book of your very own.

Q1: Why would you want to turn your content into a book?

Whether you’ve already been thinking about writing a book or you’re not convinced it’s worthwhile, this first question is for you. We asked everyone to share why they felt writing a book could be beneficial. Check out some of the responses:

Leah feels writing a book is a great way to build your platform as an expert within your niche.

Writing a book allows you to reach a new audience through a different medium, which is always a plus.

Julia said publishing a book instantly gives you authority in your niche. She was able to land a paid speaking gig and even secure new clients from publishing her own book.

For Carla, she felt a book was a beneficial way to answer all the questions she was commonly asked.

A book is a great way to put everything into one place, which makes it easier for your audience to consume.

As Ken said, portability is another benefit of writing a book. With all of your best content in one place, it’s easy for your audience to read and take with them wherever they go.

Q2: How do you know that your content is something your audience will be interested in?

Before you get started with a book, you want to make sure the topic you choose is something your audience will value. If they aren’t interested, they won’t buy! Here’s how you can make sure your book will be a hit with your target audience:

If you’re receiving a lot of comments or traffic on certain types of content, Leah said that’s a good sign you’ve got a winner. This is a great way to get started when turning your content into a book.

Make sure you’re listening to your audience. Take their feedback into consideration and allow it to guide your content.

Sarah’s advice is to research what your audience is responding to and sharing. This gives you a good idea of what their interests are so you can create the content that resonates.

If you aren’t sure what your audience truly wants, there are a few great options for you. Carla suggests doing surveys, asking questions, checking blog comments, and even viewing your Google Analytics. Discover what’s been a hit with your audience and go from there.

If you’re going to be repurposing some of your blog content as a book, that’s already going to be a good indicator of your audience’s interest. Were people sharing those posts or leaving comments? Those are signs that they liked what you were sharing.

Never be afraid to just ask your audience what they want. If you have an idea, present it to them to get their feedback.

Q3: What comes first — the book idea, the agent, or the publisher?

Do you need a book idea first or should you secure an agent or a publisher beforehand? To help answer this question, here’s some feedback from the chat:

Leah has always relied on traditional publishing, so she would create an idea first, then find an agent, and finally a publisher.

Iain recommends starting with a book idea. You want to have a topic that your audience will find valuable.

Julia said the book idea always comes first. She feels everything else will fall into place from there.

Carla starts with a book topic, plans out her idea, and then begins pitching.

Without an idea, there’s no book to be written!

As Tony said, it’s pretty hard to get someone to back you if you don’t have a great idea first.

Q4: How do you stay organized and productive throughout the writing process?

Once it’s time to start writing, you could use some tips to help you stay on track! Here are some organizational and productivity tips you can use:

Leah recommends setting daily word limits to give yourself a goal to work towards. This will keep you on track and ensure you’re making progress every day.

Don’t forget to block off writing time on your schedule!

Once you’ve got your writing time blocked off in your calendar, make sure you eliminate any distractions. You need to just focus on your writing.

You can get started by creating an outline of your ideas first. It’ll make the writing process much easier.

Julia recommends writing to match your flow, pacing yourself, and committing to deadlines.

Devin also sees the value in deadlines. They’ll ensure you’re progressing and staying on track.

Having a journal or a planner is a great way to jot down ideas and deadlines for yourself. It’s nice to have all of that information in one place for easy access.

Sarah said you should have a writing system in place. You can set deadlines to meet your goals. And make sure you’re taking breaks when needed to give yourself a mental reboot.

Whenever you get stuck, walk away from your writing for a bit. Do something else to refresh your mind and then come back to it later.

Q5: What are the pros and cons of working with a publisher versus self-publishing?

These days, many writers are choosing to skip working with a publisher in favor of self-publishing. There are benefits and downsides to both, so here’s what you need to know:

Leah said she’s more inspired when she already has an advance.

Working with a publisher gives you access to a wide array of contacts that can increase the visibility of the book, but that publisher will get some of your money from sales.

As Julia said, you can make more royalties with self-publishing.

Ken said that a publisher will hopefully set money aside for marketing, which is a major plus. If you go the self-publishing route, that task falls on your shoulders.

A publisher can also help keep you on track with deadlines, but some writers might not like having deadlines to meet.

With self-publishing, it’s all up to you. You have to be prepared to write, edit, and promote all on your own.

Q6: Once your book has been completed, what’s the next step? How do you spread the word?

Your book is done. Now what? To spread the word and increase sales on your book, check out these tips:

Social media, print, TV, radio, and guest posting are all great options to get your book out there.

You can reach out to your own network of friends and colleagues to help you with promotion. Influencers in your niche are a great way to expand your reach as well.

Your connections and influencers can really help get your book in front of more people.

Ken suggests engaging in online forms and on blogs. You want to put in the work before your book is released to build your audience and increase anticipation.

Utilize your social media outlets, network, and schedule TV and radio appearances.

Javier recommends running promotions that offer chapters for free or exclusive content. This is a great way to encourage sales and pique the interest of your audience.

Telling friends is great, but sometimes they won’t be your target audience. Make sure you’re spreading the word to people who would be most interested.

Q7: How do you actually make money once you’ve written a book (beyond an advance if you’ve gotten one)?

Your book is out there in the world and now you’re probably wondering how you can make money with it. Check out this advice for some great tips:

Leah makes money through her spokesperson income, as her books have helped her land gigs. She also suggests getting magazine assignments to continue building your platform.

For Julia, it’s all about the royalties that come in. She makes residual monthly income from her book.

You could even consider turning some of your book content into webinars that potential readers could tune into. The webinar should leave them wanting to buy your book. You can also run ads or land speaking engagements.

Make sure you continue spreading the word about your book via social media. Don’t forget about it!

As Cheval said, your book could help you land clients for your business. If your competition hasn’t written a book, you’re sure to stand out.

Zachary recommends building a website to continue growing your brand and to also try speaking gigs.

Q8: Any final advice on successfully turning your content into a book?

To close out the chat, we asked everyone to share their final tidbits on how to turn your content into a book. Here’s what some of them had to say:

Leah’s advice is that you shouldn’t try to go it alone. Having an agent can be a great support system for you as you write your book.

Work hard, set deadlines, and make sure you get an editor. These are important reminders from Iain!

Julia said you shouldn’t rush the process. It’s going to take time, so put in the effort that’s required. She also said to create a book you’re proud of.

Believe in yourself!

Katie said you shouldn’t force your content into a book format if it’s just not working out. You might find that something isn’t best as a book, which is totally okay.

Want to join our next #ContentWritingChat? Follow @ExpWriters and @writingchat, then join us every Tuesday at 10 AM Central!

#ContentWritingChat Recap: Using Twitter for Book Marketing & Promotion with Rachel Thompson

Calling all authors! Are you wondering how you can use Twitter to market and promote your brand new book? If so, you’re in luck! That’s exactly the topic we discussed in our latest #ContentWritingChat. Some amazing tips were shared from our guest host and our chat participants. We’ve compiled some of the responses into this helpful recap, so let’s dive in!

#ContentWritingChat Recap: Using Twitter for Book Marketing and Promotion with Rachel Thompson

Our guest host this week was Rachel Thompson. She’s an author, a marketer, and the owner of BadRedhead Media. Having used Twitter to market her own books, she really knows her stuff! We were excited to have her join our chat and share her expertise.

Q1: What’s the best way to use Twitter to sell books?

To kick off this week’s chat, we asked everyone to share how they felt was the best way to use Twitter to sell books. We received some great responses to this question, so here are a few of the answers:

Rachel’s advice is not to use Twitter to sell. Instead, she said to focus on building relationships with your current and potential readers. When you make that connection with people, it’s going to help you in the long run because people will be more inclined to buy from someone they know and trust.

She also suggests strategically following readers in your demographic. Provide them with valuable content, listen to what they have to say, and be authentic and helpful. They’ll appreciate you for it!

Even though it’s not something that Sarah has experience with just yet, she offered some great advice. She says you need to find your audience, meet their needs, and focus on networking.

Jenn has a great way of looking at selling! She says you need to sell yourself and why your words are worth reading. You also need to sell your words and why they should be read. If people don’t see the value in what you’ve created, they aren’t going to bother making a purchase.

Annaliese agrees. She says it’s all about focusing on the value you can provide. If you want to be successful with book marketing, showcase the value you have to offer.

You can also get creative with how your promote your next book. Have your audience get involved through a contest, which is a great way to get them doing some marketing for you. We love the idea of having them create fan art inspired by the book.

Q2: How many Twitter followers do you need to be successful?

Do you need to have a specific amount of followers in order to succeed at promoting your book? Or does it not matter? Here’s what some of our chat participants had to say:

Rachel was spot-on with her answer here. As she said, it’s all about quality and not quantity. You want followers who are truly interested in what you have to say and the work you’re creating. That’s key to seeing results with social media.

She also said that you should follow readers, book bloggers, reviewers, and publishing influencers. It’s a great idea to keep up with what those people are talking about and taking the time to engage with them.

After all, tons of followers who don’t engage with you won’t matter. You’d be better off with a smaller, engaged group than a larger group who isn’t pay any attention.

Andrea agrees! He said that 100 engaged followers on Twitter is much better than having 10,000 followers who are silent. You need an audience who is actually listening to you and engaging. Those are the people who will be most likely to buy.

Focus on building a following of current readers and potential readers if you want to succeed on Twitter.

Q3: What’s better: automation or no automation?

How do you feel about automation? Is it acceptable when promoting your book on social media or should it be avoided? Here’s some advice:

Rachel recommends ditching the automated DMs on Twitter, which typically come off as spammy and irritate your followers. But she says there’s nothing wrong with scheduling in promotional tweets or valuable content.

Varun doesn’t have a problem with automation as long as it’s monitored. You don’t want to automate conversations you have with your audience because that’s not genuine. Instead, you need to be there in real-time for those types of interactions.

When it comes to automating promotional posts, there’s nothing wrong with that. You simply shouldn’t automate engagement.

As David pointed out, it can help you reach people across multiple time zones.

Javier suggests finding a balance when it comes to social media automation. It can free up time for you to schedule certain pots in advance, but he agrees that you need to engage in real-time.

To really drive that point home, do not automate engagement with your audience!

On the flip side, a few of our chat participants recommend saying NO to automation.

But as Sarah said, it’s all about doing what works for you and your brand. That’s what matters in the end.

Q4: How can an author brand themselves on Twitter?

How do you go about branding yourself on Twitter? Check out this helpful advice from Tuesday’s chat:

One of the main things to keep in mind when branding yourself on social media? Keep it consistent! Rachel also says you need to tailor your message specifically for Twitter.

Elizabeth suggests using branded images, which makes your content recognizable on social media. She also says you can get involved in Twitter chats to establish your brand’s voice.

Varun’s advice is to build a relationship with your audience and don’t forget to connect with book lovers and reviewers as well. This is essential for book marketing!

Make sure you aren’t ignoring your fans on Twitter. Take the time to engage with them and build a relationship.

Cheval recommends focusing on providing valuable content for your audience. This will help you bring in new followers and build your brand’s presence overall.

David also said to share your insights and expertise to provide value to your audience. He had a great idea of sharing your writing process for a little behind-the-scenes content.

Q5: What’s the best way to build relationships on Twitter?

Now that we’ve already mentioned the importance of building relationships on Twitter, you need to know how to actually going about it. So, what’s the secret to connecting with your audience? Check out this advice:

Rachel’s advice is to follow people who are your ideal readers. Make the time to interact with them. They’ll take notice! This is the start of building a relationship with new people so you have to be willing to put yourself out there.

She suggests asking questions and even asking for opinions to get the conversation started. It’s so simple, but it works!

This is such a great reminder for all of us on social media! Talk WITH your audience, not at them. Conversation is a two-way street.

Annaliese says to engage with people one-on-one. Find new people and give them a follow. If you’d like to reach out to someone who is high-profile, she suggests sending a personalized message to start the conversation.

Sarah knows Twitter chats are where it’s at! They’re an easy way to make connections with other like-minded people. Find some in your niche and start participating.

Courtney also recommends joining Twitter chats. As she pointed out, it’s also an opportunity to learn new things. You can find out a lot about your audience by connecting with them through chats.

Varun’s advice is to engage in real-time conversation. He suggests starting your own Twitter chat or being a guest on another popular chat. It’s a great way to leverage someone else’s audience.

Twitter chats, one-on-one conversations, and genuine interaction are essential in Elizabeth’s book.

Zala says you should be a cheerleader for others! Be interested in what they have to say, reach out, and support one another. This is so effective when it comes to building real relationships through social media.

Q6: How can an author incorporate blogging and Twitter?

As an author, you probably know how effective both blogging and Twitter can be. But how do you go about incorporating these two things into your online strategy? Take a look at these suggestions from this week’s chat:

On Twitter, you can find relevant hashtags for sharing and promoting your work. As Rachel mentioned, she started a hashtag that encourages people to share their blog content. This will really come in handy for authors who want to expand their reach on Twitter.

She also mentioned how blogging consistently can help with SEO. This is great if you want to increase traffic to your website and build your online presence overall.

Jenn sees it as an opportunity to share your words, your thoughts, and your experiences. You can make use of both Twitter and blogging for this.

Elizabeth suggest using blogging as a bite-size way to give people a taste of your writing. It’s a subtle way to go about book marketing that can yield great results. If people like what they see on your blog, they’ll be more inclined to purchase your book.

Q7: What are Twitter Lists and how can authors use them?

You can add specific users to a “list” on Twitter, which helps cut down on the noise and gives you the chance to see updates from just those people. But are you actively using this feature? Many people forget all about it, but it’s worth making use of it! Here’s how you can use Twitter Lists as an author:

Rachel recommends using Lists to filter your followers. She encourages you to create as many as you want. They can also be private or public.

As Jenn said, Lists allow you to segment people into specific groups. An author might opt to create lists for readers, influencers, and bloggers.

Create Lists for promoters and readers for efficient book marketing on Twitter.

Lists allow you to filter out the content that doesn’t matter and focus on what really counts. You’ll be able to easily keep up with what’s going on in your niche with these curated lists.

Annaliese also suggests using Lists to stay used on trends relevant to your audience and industry.

Q8: How do you find readers/your demographic?

To wrap up the chat, we asked everyone to share their advice on how to find your readers on Twitter. Here’s what you need to know:

Rachel recommends using Manage Flitter, which allows you to input keywords for tweets or bios. You’ll be able to easily find people you’re looking for.

Eddie’s advice is to scope out other Twitter Lists and check out social media groups, like the ones on Facebook.

Varun knows Twitter Advanced Search can come in handy when searching for your target audience. He also said to use popular hashtags or search generic terms to locate them. You can even check out your competitors! After all, you need to locate your audience and connect with them for successful book marketing on Twitter.

Join the fun every Tuesday at 10 AM Central Time! Follow us on Twitter (@ExpWriters and @writingchat) and be there for the next live chat!
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